Wildlife NGOs

As promised, here is part 2 of this years best 40 NGOs working to save wildlife and wild lands all over the world. There are many organizations doing great work saving wild, but I have chosen those NGOs for wildlife that I am familiar with, or that I think deserve more attention for the wonderful work they are doing.
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Part 1 of the best NGOs for wildlife that won’t waste your money was published last month.

Here is Part 2:

 

 

SAVING OCEAN SPECIES

 

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project (Dolphins)

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project (not to be confused with other organizations with a similar name) was founded on Earthday 1970 with the aim to stop dolphin slaughter and exploitation around the world after ‘Flipper’ committed suicide in his arms. Ric O’Barry has pioneered the re-adaptation & release of captive dolphins into the wild.

 

Oceana

The world’s oceans are in trouble, and this organization works with companies and legislators to bring about more sustainable practices for the long-term health of the ocean and its creatures.

 

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

Sea Shepherd uses innovative direct-action tactics to investigate, document, and take action when necessary to expose and confront the destruction of habitat and slaughter of wildlife in the world’s oceans in order to conserve and protect ecosystems and species.

 

 

 

SAVING SPECIFIC SPECIES

Painted Dog Conservation (African Wild Dog)

Painted dogs, or african wild dogs, are among Africa’s most endangered species with only 3,000 – 5,000 left. Zimbabwe is home to one of the last strongholds of the species and PDC works to educate the local communities about the importance and beauty of this iconic species.

**SavingWild.com has partnered with PDC to sponsor school children to go through their Wild School program.

 

 North American Bear Center   (Black Bears)

All eight bear species around the world are listed as vulnerable, threatened or endangered. The Bear Center is dedicated to replacing misconceptions with education and scientific facts to conserve bear habitat, stop poaching for bear body parts, rehabilitate injured and orphaned bears back to the wild, and implement methods to reduce conflict between humans and bears.

 

The Cougar Fund (Mountain Lions)

The Cougar Fund protects the cougar – also known as a mountain lion, puma, and panther – and other carnivores throughout the Americas by educating children and adults on their value, and by monitoring state policies and advocating for management based on sound science, to assure a lasting place for these creatures.

 

Australian Society for Kangaroos

The Australian Society for Kangaroos works to educate the public about the iconic, cultural, spiritual and economical value of all species of kangaroos and wallabies who are victims of the world’s largest land-based wildlife massacre.

 

National Audubon Society (Birds)

Audubon’s mission is to conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity.

 

Free the Bears (Asian Bears used for Bile Farming)

Started by animal advocate and grandmother Mary Hutton after watching a current affairs TV program in Perth about the bile farms with captive Asiatic bears, the mission of this organization is to protect, preserve and enrich the lives of bears throughout the world.

 

 ProjectCoyote

Project Coyote works to change negative attitudes toward coyotes, wolves and other native American carnivores by replacing ignorance and fear with understanding, respect and appreciation.

 

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WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING/POACHING

International Anti-Poaching Foundation 

The IAPF has a structured approach to conservation, employing the relevant tactics and technology to defend wildlife from the ever increasing threat of poaching within protected areas. Anti-poaching however is only a portion of the conservation solution. To be a part of successful projects, the IAPF works alongside partners who specialise in community engagement and development, research and development, wildlife rescue and biodiversity management.

 

Wild Aid   (Illegal Wildlife Trade)

Wild Aid is the only organization focused on reducing the demand for wildlife parts and products, with the strong and simple message: when the buying stops, the killing can too. Their mission is to end illegal wildlife trade.

 

 

 

SAVING WILD PLACES FOR WILDLIFE

 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Wildlife Corridors)

A joint United States and Canada Initiative, it is recognized as one of the planet’s leading mountain conservation initiatives to preserve and maintain the wildlife, native plants, wilderness and natural processes of the mountainous region from Yellowstone National Park to the Yukon Territory.

 

 Great Plains Conservation

Working in Africa, their mission is to find the right formula of conservation, communities and commerce that would make a lasting, sustainable difference to the world’s iconic wildlife and wildernesses.

Land Trust Alliance

The Alliance brings its more than 1,100 member land trusts together — and increases each one’s success by advocating for the policies and incentives that it takes to save millions of acres every year.

 

 

SAVING ALL AFRICAN WILDLIFE

African Wildlife Conservation Fund

The African Wildlife Conservation Fund promotes the long-term sustainability of healthy wildlife populations via research and educational partnerships with landowners and community members, natural resource managers, conservationists, and governments in Africa.

 

Wildlife Direct

Wildlife Direct is a Kenya and US registered organization founded and chaired by African conservationist Dr. Richard Leakey, who is credited with putting an end to the elephant slaughter in Kenya in the 1980s. Established in 2006 Wildlife Direct provides support to conservationists in Africa directly on the ground via the use of blogs, which enables anybody, anywhere to play a direct and interactive role in the survival of some of the world’s most precious species.

 

Tusk Trust

Based in Britain with twenty-two years experience initiating and funding conservation, community development and environmental education programs across Africa, Tusk has raised over $30 million for a wide range of projects across the African continent. Their annual conservation awards, presented by Prince William, highlight inspirational conservation work in Africa.

 

 

 

SAVING INDIA’S WILDLIFE

Conservation India

A great organization focused on India’s wildlife and wild places by providing reliable information and the tools needed to campaign effectively. They are working to protect elephants, and tigers, as well as fighting against plastic litter.

 

 

Note: Charity Navigator provides an important service to donors interested in U.S. charities, but it is unable to capture the entire picture of the work and structure of some international wildlife organizations. Charity Navigator itself states: “We do not recommend using our ratings as the only factor in deciding whether to support a particular organization.”

 

I hope you are finding these lists of the best NGOs for wildlife helpful when choosing where you can be most effective with your giving. If you missed part 1 check it out now

Love,

Lori

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Replies to “Best NGOs For Wildlife, Part 2”

  1. Hi,I give all I can to NGO wildlife and this list of good ones is very useful. But, it’s my feeling to believe they are too numerous. Couldn’t they be more efficient if they were fewer but bigger? If they were bigger, they can share their equipment and so on.
    What do you think about this idea.

    Also, is it possible to know the bad NGO wildlife that put our donations in their pocket instead of helping where the needs are?
    Best regards

  2. Hi Jacques,
    I agree with you that there are too many NGOs out there and many times they are competing with each other for funds, status, etc. Yes, they do sometimes work together on issues but they are always trying to promote themselves. Its too bad there is not more collaboration and melding of organizations to make them bigger. Bigger is not always better though.
    I would not like to be the one pointing fingers at the worst NGOs and could not be absolutely sure who those are unless I had worked there myself. So, instead, I just list the ones I believe are doing a good job, thereby giving them a little promotional boost.
    Thanks for commenting.

Comments are closed.